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Tag:White Wine

by Sam Logan | October 26, 2017
Gems from Northern Italy Even though I was raised by a Francophile and a Hispanist, it never occurred to me to visit Italy before this September. I don’t know what took me so long; Italy seemed to me like a marriage of France and Spain along with its own unique character. I spent a week […]
by Sam Logan | October 4, 2017
The Camino de Santiago is an ancient Christian pilgrimage to the holy city of Santiago de Compostela in Northern Spain. Recently, it has experienced a surge in popularity due in part to the 2010 Emilio Estevez film The Way. The potential routes to Santiago de Compostela converge in the spectacularly scenic territory of Spain’s northern […]
by Sam Logan | October 2, 2017
The south of France enjoys a certain reputation. Tell anyone that’s where you’re headed, and they’ll probably picture you enjoying champagne on a superyacht flanked by the ultrarich and European aristocracy. But the south of France isn’t all about obscene luxury on the Riviera. Despite not having the same reputation as premier French regions like […]
by Sam Logan | September 26, 2017
 A Taste of Mendoza It comes as a surprise to many people that Ireland imports more wine from Chile than from any other country. We drink more Chilean wine than French, Spanish or Italian. What’s even more surprising, given that we so enjoy Chilean wine, is that we drink very little wine from Argentina.   […]
by Sam Logan | August 25, 2017
We visited the Domaine De l’Hortus in the middle of July, about six or seven weeks ago. From the moment we arrived at the winery the impression I got was one of control and planning.   Even superficially, l’Hortus is different to most of the other vineyards and wineries we had visited. The winery is […]
by Sam Logan | August 23, 2017
Organic Focus What does a white wine from Offida in Italy’s Marche have in common with a red wine from Corbières in the South of France? They look different, they have distinct flavours, and they’re made by different people. What brings these wines together is that both wines are made in a way that respects […]
by Sam Logan | August 23, 2017
Tahbilk Tahbilk is one of Australia’s oldest and most prestigious wineries. While his family have been making wine there for decades, Alistair Purbrick is the first officially credentialed winemaker to work at Tahbilk. He graduated Roseworthy from College (the mecca for Aussie winemakers) at age 24, and he took over as head winemaker at Tahbilk. […]
by Sam Logan | August 23, 2017
Feudo Luparello Sicilian winery Feudo Luparello is owned and run by Walter Bartolomei, one of Italy’s foremost independent winemakers. His other vineyards may be familiar to fans of Italian wine; Ciù Ciù and Costadoro, both located on the Adriatic Coast. Walter and his brother, Massimiliano, worked with Feudo Luparello as consultants for years before purchasing […]
by Sam Logan | August 23, 2017
La Famille Courselle How do you make wine that captures all the joy and innocence of childhood? To begin with, you would need to be a truly gifted winemaker. You should also have spent your own childhood in “a magic place among the vines”. Lastly, investing the wine with an exuberant and carefree character would […]
by Sam Logan | August 18, 2017
We love a maverick. There’s something inherently compelling about someone who plays by their own rules and succeeds, despite the disapproval of others. I really admire people with the independence to do something new, particularly if it’s unpopular at first. Judging by the careers of artists like Sinead O’Connor, James Joyce, and Bruce Willis I’m […]
by Sam Logan | August 4, 2017
  As a vineyard, San Simone is a bit like Robin Williams. Now, that might sound a little strange, but hear me out. Robin Williams was an outstanding actor, as well as a hilarious stand-up comedian. Before his tragic suicide (coincidentally, three years ago this week) he starred in best comedies of the 80s, 90s […]
by Sam Logan | July 28, 2017
A passionate dedication to a place is a characteristic usually attributed to French winemakers. It’s easy to imagine a proud and surly vigneron dismissing their neighbouring regions, and the wines those regions produce, with Gallic disdain. This fanaticism is encapsulated in the term terroirist – a winemaker who is committed to the influence their landscape […]
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